Monday, February 13, 2012


In the world of organic gardening, there are plenty of great resources available to both new and experienced organic gardeners alike. There are many e-guides, books, videos, and other resources available. This set of tips contains some of the best advice for helping a good organic gardener become a great organic gardener.
What plants are native to your area? You want to plan your landscaping around native flowers, bushes and grasses. Selecting plants which will thrive in your area, and get along with the plants you already have, you won't have to use as much fertilizer or pesticides. Native plants will thrive if you encourage growth with organically made compost.
Know what to look for when choosing plants for your organic garden. This is particularly important when you buy perennials or annuals. You’ll want to be certain to get the ones that have budded, but not bloomed. This ensures that the plant has a better chance of taking root in your garden.
Always give your organic vegetable garden the benefit of looking beneath the upper portions of a plant. When buying tomato seedlings for the garden, keep an eye on lush green starts, with root systems that are bad. These kind of starts stay on these seedlings for weeks at a time; this doesn't allow the seedling to grow unless the starts are gone.
Rotate the plants that you grow each year by switching up where you plant them. Fungus and diseases will appear if you have the same kind of plants in the same place from one year to the next. These diseases can build up in the soil, re-infecting your plants the next year. If you change things and plant your garden in a different area, you will have a way to keep fungus at bay.
If you over-water your plants, they can't get all the nutrients they need from the dirt. If you are going to water your plants outdoors, you should first check the weather for your area to see if any rain is coming that day. If a downpour is coming, you may want to forgo watering your plants that day.
One of the most important things to consider when plotting your organic garden is to make note of your available space. When the garden is bare, it is sometimes hard to envision how much space a mature plant actually needs. Your plants will need the space not only because of their physical size, but also because the space will provide air circulation for the garden. Make sure that you map out your garden layout beforehand and place your seeds with an adequate amount of space in between each.
Organic gardening is a relaxing hobby that will give you a great sense of satisfaction. This kind of vegetable gardening keeps you more involved in planting, cultivating and harvesting, giving you a clearer picture of the entire life cycle of each plant.
When running your own organic garden, you should consider digging small ditches in between your plant rows. This way, when you water your plants, the water will flow directly to them, and they won't need to be watered as much. This conserves water, which translates into conserving money.
Many different sorts of plants will grow in an organic garden. Treat plants that thrive in acid to some mulch. These kinds of plants require mulch consisting of a lot of pine needles during the fall each year. As the needles begin to decompose, they'll start depositing natural acid to the soil.
For the best results when mulching, you should aim to create a bed of mulch two to three inches thick. Mulch adds nutrients to the soil, keeps the soil moist, reduces weed growth, and makes beds look tidier.
When you are organically growing tomatoes, try planting only some seeds at once; then go back and plant an additional set of seeds in three weeks. This allows your harvest to grow in stages. Furthermore, this method protects you in the event that your first batch doesn't thrive as expected.
You undoubtedly have a greater understanding of all that is involved with successful organic gardening after reading this article. Keep learning more tricks and start practicing with a few plants. When you keep this in mind, you can go about planting and growing a garden in your own way.

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